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Friday, November 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of The outlook for U.S. energy supplies and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge decision found in the catalog.

The outlook for U.S. energy supplies and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge decision

The outlook for U.S. energy supplies and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge decision

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  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Petroleum industry and trade -- Economic aspects -- United States,
  • Petroleum industry and trade -- United States -- Forecasting,
  • Oil and gas leases -- Economic aspects -- Alaska -- Arctic National Wildlife Refuge,
  • Natural resources -- Alaska,
  • Power resources -- United States,
  • Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska)

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesOutlook for US energy supplies and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge decision
    StatementJohn J. Schanz, Jr
    SeriesMajor studies and issue briefs of the Congressional Research Service -- 1988-89, reel 6, fr. 0001
    ContributionsLibrary of Congress. Congressional Research Service
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationv, 27 p.
    Number of Pages27
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18160282M

      For 30 Years, a Political Battle Over Oil and ANWR The political saga around whether to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is one of tricky legislative maneuvers, late-night. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Area, Petroleum Assessment, , Including Economic Analysis T INTRODUCTION he Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act () established the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) (fig. 1). In section of that act, Congress deferred a decision regarding future management of theFile Size: KB. The article reports on the approval of a legislation that would allow oil drilling at the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska by the U.S. House of Representatives on House Resources Committee Chairman Richard Pombo asserts on the lack of logical reason to oppose the.   In , the Senate took up the question of whether to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It’s worth stepping back to recall the context for that : Senator Michael Bennet.


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The outlook for U.S. energy supplies and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge decision Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The outlook for U.S. energy supplies and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge decision. [John J Schanz; Library of Congress.

Congressional Research Service.]. Web site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are pleased to announce that on Friday, April 3,Geoffrey Haskett, Regional Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska, signed the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement (CCP/FEIS).

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR or Arctic Refuge) is a national wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska, United consists of 19, acres (78, km 2) in the Alaska North Slope region.

It is the largest national wildlife refuge in the country, slightly larger than the Yukon Delta National Wildlife refuge is administered from offices in nates: 68°45′N °30′W /.

Resource management within Arctic Refuge is designed to maintain the natural environment, and its diversity of plants and animals, with minimal evidence of human impacts. Wildlife populations and their habitats are allowed to function and change through ecological processes.

Our focus is on understanding and monitoring these natural systems. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge contains an enormous biological diversity that is protected by the many Arctic treaties to protect wildlife.

Yet, despite these treaties and ANWR being a designated refuge, it is still at risk from oil development due to weak enforcement of said treaties.

See U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Area, Alaska,2-CD set, USGS Open File Report ; and U.S.

Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Economics of U.S. Geological Survey's Area Regional Assessment: An Economic Update. The blog began with an analogy to the economic implausibility and national-security risks of oil* from the vast Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Author: Amory B.

Lovins. Alaska Natives, communities of color, outdoor enthusiasts, veterans and conservation and religious leaders from across the U.S. are standing together to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Check out the We Are The Arctic book which showcases the vast beauty of this remarkable untouched wilderness and videos from campaign members. The study site at the Canning River Delta in Arctic Refuge was established in the late s and has since become the primary tundra nesting bird research station for the refuge.

Work at this location is a collaboration between Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Manomet, Inc., and the U.S. Geological Survey. The estimated oil reserves in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge would meet current world oil demand for at least another 50 years. false Nuclear power is now the world's fastest-growing energy source.

Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. May Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the.

The Fight over the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Is Back Congress may soon allow drilling in the wildlife refuge to offset Republicans' planned tax cuts By Brittany Patterson, Author: E&E News.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, commonly known as ANWR, is a million acre national wildlife preserve in northeast Alaska. The United. A assessment by the U.S.

Energy Information Administration found oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge wouldn’t lower oil prices because, “Assuming that world oil markets continue to work as they do today, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) could neutralize any potential price impact of ANWR oil.

A decision by the Obama administration Friday to postpone new offshore oil-and-gas exploration in U.S. Arctic waters deals a setback to energy companies hoping to. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S.

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Area, Alaska. by ANWR Assessment Team U.S.

Geological Survey. Open File Report To view report entirely in PDF format Start HERE HELP with PDF problems Click HERE.

In anticipation of the need for scientific support for policy decisions and in light of the decade-old perspective of a previous assessment, the USGS has completed a reassessment of the petroleum potential of the ANWR area.

This was a comprehensive study by a team of USGS scientists in collaboration on technical issues (but not the assessment) with colleagues in other agencies and.

U.S. Sen, Maria Cantwell is trying to block legislation that would make petroleum production a purpose of a million-acre section of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Called "America's Serengeti" for its tremendous biodiversity, the coastal plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on Alaska’s North Slope is one of the most intact and untouched ecosystems in America. The refuge is home to more than species of birds, 42 species of fish, and 45 mammal species—including more thanhead of caribou.

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Alternative Solutions to Drilling by Rachel Beyeler Thesis: If the United States is going to choose to conserve energy responsibly, then our government's energies should not be focused on developing oil in the ANWR, but rather on the topics of conservation through higher fuel efficiency standards in vehicles and by developing alternative energy sources.

A proposal to open up part of the Arctic National Wildlife refuge to oil drilling has been dropped from the House budget bill, but it could still resurface if lawmakers eventually approve a budget.

The coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ranks as one of the most controversial chunks of land in Alaska. Since Congress set it.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge lies on the Arctic coastline at Alaska's northern slope. 13 In the early s, oil seeps began to appear east of Point Barrow along.

Federal Agency Pegs $4M for Arctic Refuge Infrastructure. The Interior Department plans to spend $4 million in the section of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge where petroleum drilling may be.

Arctic Power is a grassroots, non-profit citizen’s organization with 1,s of members founded in April of to expedite congressional and presidential approval of oil and gas exploration and production within the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The Oil Market and Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Jeffrey M.

Perloff & Robert Whaples The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), the largest of Alaska’s 16 national wildlife refuges, covers million acres. It also contains massive deposits of Size: KB. In his essay Ken Boyd gives his rationale for Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) oil drilling.

Which of the following statements is one of his reasons. Drilling in ANWR will quadruple the amount of oil Alaska is currently producing. The native Inupiat Eskimo people would receive all. The coastal plain, on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge's northern edge, is home to caribou, polar bears and hundreds of bird species.

Credit: Katrina Liebich/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. NEW YORK (Reuters) - A group of 37 U.S.-based scientists whose research focuses on Arctic wildlife asked two U.S. senators in a letter on Thursday.

The tax bill headed to President Trump for signature lifts a ban on oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. But it might take years for drilling to begin, if it ever does. Alaska politicians are furious about Obama's proposal to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil and gas development.

They've argued ANWR is. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Area, Petroleum Assessment, T INTRODUCTION he Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act () established the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) (fig.

1) as a wildlife refuge. In section of that act, Congress deferred a decision regarding future. Arctic Power is a grassroots, non-profit citizen’s organization with 1,s of members founded in April of to expedite congressional and presidential approval of oil and gas exploration and production within the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

The western boundary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, located on Alaska’s North Slope, has been redrawn and 2 oil and gas exploration leases pending since have been awarded. There has been a longstanding discrepancy with regard to ANWR’s western boundary – covering roug acres – with US Fish & Wildlife Service maps.

In addition, drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) impacts students either directly (depending on the age level) or indirectly (through their parents) as gas prices soar to record high levels. Activities, and Assessments U.S.

Department of Energy. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The National Park Service and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service manage about half of the federal land for resource protection and wildlife conservation.[2] 2. ANWR spans an area larger than many U.S. states.

ANWR spans million acres of land. That’s an area eight times larger than Yellowstone National Park or about the size of South. Should energy resources in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge be developed?Viewpoint: Yes, energy resources in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should be developed because dependence on foreign resources poses a serious threat to the security of the Uni Source for information on Should energy resources in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge be developed: Science in Dispute dictionary.

People who oppose drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Roger Kaye (wilderness specialist/pilot) and Jim Kurth (Arctic National Wildlife Refuge manager, to ), 6th World Wilderness Congress, Bangalore, India, October "Lowell Sumner compared the Refuge to a national monument most Americans will never see.

ANWR: The Great Divide The renewed debate over drilling for oil in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge hits home for the two Native groups nearest the nature preserve By Scott Wallace. Oil drilling in a vast Alaskan wildlife refuge moved a step closer to reality on Wednesday after the U.S.

Senate energy and natural resources panel voted 13. The Oil and Gas Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Area, Alaska. U.S.G.S.

Open File Report (Washington, DC: ) Summary, and Table EA4. (Report available on 2-disk CD-ROM.) According to USGS, there is an excellent chance (95%) that at least billion barrels are present on federal lands in the area.NBER Program(s):Environment and Energy Economics, Public Economics.

This paper provides model-based estimates of the value of oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The best estimate of economically recoverable oil in the federal portion of ANWR is billion barrels of oil, a quantity roughly equal to US consumption in The debate over oil and gas development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is part of a larger push to develop energy resources throughout the Arctic Circle.

Sponsored by the United Nations Environmental Programme, this website compiles graphics, maps, and case studies describing the Arctic, its peoples, and threats to the region’s well.